Ballinagatta Townland

Michael Kelly / Siobhan Ruane

In 1901 there are 5 houses which are all recorded as private dwellings and 3 are 2nd class with two listed as 3rd class. There are 17 outbuildings consisting of 5 stables, 3 piggeries, 2 cow-houses, 2 fowl houses, 2 sheds and one potato house. There were 22 people living in these 5 households, 9 males and 13 females, all of whom were Roman Catholic. The heads of the households were also the landowners except house numbers 1 and 3 where the landowner is recorded as William Glynn.

 

House 1: Glynn / Naon[1]

Elizabeth (70) is the head of the family, she lives with her son Owen (35) and both can read and write and speak English and Irish. Elizabeth is a widow and farmer while Own is single and also a farmer. Patrick Noon (40) and John Barrett (16) are farm servants also living here. John Barrett can read and write and speaks both Irish and English while Patrick cannot read but speaks Irish and English All are Roman Catholic.  The house is a private dwelling with walls of stone or concrete and a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable material. The house has 4 rooms and 4 windows to the front. They have 2 stables, a piggery, a barn, fowl house, potato house and a shed. The landowner is recorded as William Glynn.

House 2: Lyons / Healy

Thomas (40) is the head of the family and is married to Ellen (39) and have two daughters and a son – Mary (14), Michael (11) and Bridget (7). They all can read and write. Also living in the house was Michael Healy (27) brother-in-law, unmarried farmer. All the adults spoke both English and Irish and all were Roman Catholic. Thomas Lyons was also the landowner. The house is a private dwelling with walls of stone or concrete and a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable material. It is recorded as a 2nd class house with 3 rooms and 3 windows to the front. The outbuildings consisted of a stable, cow-house, piggery, barn and a shed.

 

House 3: Connor / Gilmore

Bridget (75) is the head of the family, she cannot read but speaks Irish and English, is a widow and a labourer. She shares the house with her grand-daughter Ellen Gilmore (8). Ellen can read and write, speaks English and is a scholar. Both are Roman Catholic. The house is a 2nd class private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable material. The house has 2 rooms with 2 windows to the front. The only outbuilding is a fowl-house and the landowner is recorded as William Glynn.

[1] Noon is transcribed as Naon

House 4: Healy

John (55) is the head of the family and lives with his wife Catherine (40), son Patrick (13) and his unmarried sister Catherine (50). Both John and wife Catherine could read only, Patrick could read and write and his sister Catherine could do neither. All were Roman Catholic. John is a farmer.  The house was a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone, brick or concrete and a rood of thatch, wood or other perishable material. There were 3 rooms with 3 windows to the front. The only outbuilding is a stable. The census from was signed by John using his mark which was witnessed by Constable Doonan.

House 5:  Kenny

Patrick (62),   the head of the family was born in Co. Leitrim and was married to Bessie who came from Co. Longford. They had four daughters – Lucy B (15), Maggie T (14), Sarah (10) and Alice (8). All the children were born in County Galway. All occupants could read and write and all were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a farmer and Bessie a house-keeper. The house was a 3rd class private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. The house had 3 rooms with 1 window to the front.

 

This page was added on 03/03/2020.

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